Outgrowing Friendships

In life, there come periods where change is inevitable.

Nothing can stay the same forever. That includes our circle of friends. Friendships are based on commonalities, not just whether you like each other or not. When those common interests begin to fall away, it means that growth is happening to one, the other, or hopefully both parties.

Growth is the natural order of things. As we age, we change. As we explore the world we find new exciting things that trip our fancy, we form opinions based on our experiences, we work on ourselves letting go of old baggage that doesn’t serve us any longer.

Friends will sometimes remark “you’ve changed” and mean it in a not so nice fashion. Take it as a compliment. It means you haven’t been remaining stagnant. Whether your friend approves or not is inconsequential.

Friends are wonderful things. It is important to have people in your world who genuinely care about you and your wellbeing and vice versa. All friendships aren’t meant to last a lifetime though. It may feel strange or uncomfortable to feel like you should walk away and leave someone in your past, but it is a natural occurrence in life and will happen time and time again. It doesn’t mean you no longer care about them or that they didn’t play a major role in your life for a time.

What it means is that we all are destined to walk our own path and not everyone is meant to follow along. They have their own trail to go down too. If you feel like you have outgrown your friend or group of friends, it’s likely you have. Wish them well and continue on your way.

Clearing room in your social circle opens up space energetically for new better-suited matches to arrive in your life.

Be excited to see who is next.

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Enriching Your Life By Giving

The perception of wealth has mistakenly become all about what we have and what we can get on a material level. True wealth is measured in richness of life and of the heart. It is boosted not by what we get but by what we give and whom we help.

You don’t have to be well off financially to give of yourself. In many social experiments it has been found that those who have the least tend to give the most because they know what it is like to go without.

A few years back I came across a book that I haven’t been able to forget. “29 Gifts – How a Month of Giving Can Change Your Life” by Cami Walker.

One month after her wedding day, 33-year-old Cami Walker was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, and the life she knew changed forever. Cami was soon in and out of L.A.’s emergency rooms with alarming frequency as she battled the neurological condition that left her barely able to walk and put enormous stress on her marriage. Each day brought new negative thoughts:

“I’m going to end up in a wheelchair… My life is over.

“Why did this have to happen to me?”

Then, as a remedy for her condition, Cami received an uncommon prescription from a friend, an African Medicine Woman named Mbali Creazzo. The prescription was simply to give away 29 gifts in 29 days.

“By giving,” Mbali told her, “you are focusing on what you have to offer others, inviting more abundance into your life.”

The gifts, she said, could be anything, but their giving had to be both authentic and mindful. At least one gift needed to be something she felt was scarce in her life.

Cami was amazed by what unfolded during her month-long journey. Not only did her state of mind improve but her health did as well.

I myself will be doing this challenge starting July 1st, 2015. I would like to invite you, our readers, to join me.

Gifts can be anything including a nice gesture – those are free and we never run out. This world needs more kindness. If we want the world to change, we have to start with ourselves.

To learn more go to www.29gifts.org